Adam's Area Photos For Listings



A commonly neglected element of real estate photography is area amenity photos, taken not at the home itself, but from the air and from the ground, within easy reach of future prospective buyers, but too far for most listing agents to take the time to care about. These amenities & local attractions often have a lot to offer. These photos start with HOA/Condo amenities, if applicable, but they don't stop there.


Often 50 photos is the limit for MLS input entry. A small number of area amenity photos enhance an already high square footage &/or high acreage listing, while a higher number of area amenity photos can cover significant gaps in space for a smaller home so that a full 50 photos is present. Below I wanted to share some examples of precisely that.


Below I'll be covering:

I. My typical listing practice for photography

II. The importance of HOA/Condo amenities, when applicable, and area attractions

III. The importance of ground & air area photos

IV. Including large places of work in area photos

V. Not neglecting the area immediately surrounding a home

VI. Additional Examples


I. My typical listing practice for photography is to use the following at no cost to the seller:

1. At the home

a. Professional photography of the home

b. virtual tours

c. aerial photography


2. In the neighborhood when the community has amenities within it:

Amenity photos from the ground and air


3. Outside the neighborhood:

Amenity &/or local job photos from the ground and air


II. The importance of HOA/Condo amenities, when applicable, and area attractions


In the rare cases when these photos are taken, it's often only within the confines of the home owner's association or condo association. Those are important photos, but when limited to those photos, there is a lot that can be missed. In Kingsmill, for instance, it's good to show amenities like the tennis courts within the Kingsmill community:

But to not also show Busch Gardens, that's essentially adjacent to the Kingsmill community, you'd be missing out on a significant draw to the area.

III. The importance of ground & air area photos


Also when these photos are taken, it's typically from the ground, with no aerials included. In my opinion, both on the ground and aerial photos are best integrated into listings. For instance, the Air & Space Center (below) was located six tenths of a mile away from a property I had listed on Lee St. For that, I included both of the below images that I shot with the captions I included in the MLS for buyers to see identifying amenities & stating the proximity to the amenities:

Air & Space Center & Carousel

Air & Space Center, Carousel, Harbor & Hampton University


IV. Including large places of work in area photos:

I don't always include "jobs" in photos, but in many cases, a sizeable job may be in close proximity for the area while having excellent aesthetic appeal. For instance, in a property in Newport News close to Christopher Newport University & Riverside hospital, it's good to include aerials of each, showcasing options for someone living there as well as resale/investment potential in the long term:

Above: Riverside Hospital



Above: Christopher Newport University


V. Not neglecting the area immediately surrounding a home

While not typically the case, in some cases, the area immediately surrounding a home is so compelling of a selling point that the home as well as the immediately surrounding area is included in one or multiple photos. Here's a former listing photo of mine that is a prime example where here is a shot of the primary picture in the listing:


Of course we didn't stop there in the immediate area, with photos like these as well:




VI. Here are some more examples:


Norfolk: Light Rail

Norfolk: Nauticus & Battleship Wisconsin

Richmond

Smithfield Station




Jones Mill Pond in Williamsburg along with Colonial Parkway

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